Past Courses / Events

Using the Internet of Animals to Monitor Local and Global Biodiversity

Institute Seminar by Roland Kays
  • Date: May 28, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Roland Kays
  • Roland Kays is a scientist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University. He is host of the Wild Animals Podcast and the Wild Animals YouTube Channel.
  • Location: Bückle St. 5a, 78467 Konstanz
  • Room: Seminar room MPI-AB Bücklestrasse + Online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: cmonteza@ab.mpg.de
My vision for conservation focuses on animal population size and connectivity. First, we need annual estimates of animal abundance and their trends to know which species most need our help, where. Second, we need species-specific measures of habitat connectivity between these populations to ensure ... [more]

Conflict, collars, and fences: Managing landscapes for the benefit of people and wildlife in the Serengeti, Tanzania

Institute Seminar by Kristen Snyder
  • Date: May 21, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Kristen Snyder
  • I completed my PhD at the University of California – Davis, where my work focused on human-wildlife conflict and conservation planning. I joined the Grumeti Fund in 2015 while completing my degree and have subsequently worked with the organization in varying capacities as a postdoctoral fellow, Head Scientist, and Scientific Advisor (current). In 2019 I led the development and launch of our applied research program and facility, Research and Innovation for the Serengeti Ecosystem (RISE, see 'further information'). I am an affiliated scientist with the Wittemyer Lab at Colorado State University and Chief Scientist at Natural Capital. Human-wildlife conflict, coexistence, and linking science with conservation management are common themes in my work, which I approach from an interdisciplinary perspective and using a variety of tools, including household surveys, camera traps, wildlife GPS collars, and remote sensing.
  • Location: Bückle St. 5a, 78467 Konstanz
  • Room: Seminar room MPI-AB Bücklestrasse + Online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: ktiedeman@ab.mpg.de
In rural communities, Human-Wildlife Conflict (HWC) can pose a serious threat to household food security, safety, and livelihoods, and in turn, undermine conservation efforts. Managing HWC has become an increasingly important component of managing wildlife populations and protected areas. The ... [more]

One-year update #2: how migratory soaring flight develops

Rado Seminar by Hester Brønnvik
  • Date: May 17, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Hester Brønnvik
  • Location: Hybrid meeting
  • Room: Seminar room MPI-AB Bücklestrasse + Online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: ddechmann@ab.mpg.de
Movement is a fundamental aspect of life, but it can be energetically costly. Soaring birds have a high cost of transport and are forced to depend on atmospheric uplifts to afford long-distance flight. Thus, riding uplifts efficiently is a vital skill for them. Some vital skills are not innate and ... [more]

Social learning and cultural behavioural evolution

Institute Seminar by Claudio Tennie
  • Date: May 14, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Claudio Tennie
  • Claudio Tennie's (University of Tübingen) main research interest is the "evolution of cultural evolution" - which he sees most clearly in the human case. Towards a better understanding of the human case especially, he studies humans as well as humans' closest living (apes) and dead (hominins) relatives. This approach also explains his unusual background: originally trained as a behavioural biologist, he became a comparative psychologist during his PhD (MPI EVAN, Leipzig). Later, he again retrained as a cognitive archaeologist (especially with regard to early stone tools) - the field of study also of his recent ERC "STONECULT" grant.
  • Location: Bückle St. 5a, 78467 Konstanz
  • Room: Seminar room MPI-AB Bücklestrasse + Online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: cschuppli@ab.mpg.de
The topic of social learning initially had a slow start in animal behaviour, but now even exists as its own sub-field. My own niche within this new field is the study of ape social learning, and of ape cultures. Yet, regardless of study species, one of the main lessons from decades of study is that ... [more]

Ecological importance and conservation ecology of white sharks

Institute Seminar by Jerry Moxley
  • Date: May 7, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Jerry Moxley
  • Dr. Moxley joins us from Florida International University, where he is a research faculty member under the mentorship of Drs. Michael Heithaus and Yannis Papastamatiou. Prior to FIU, Jerry completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Monterey Bay Aquarium as a white shark biologist. He has received advanced degrees from Duke University and Princeton University, conducting spatial and behavioral ecology research on gray seals, baleen whales, reef fish, and even interactions amongst army ant swarms and parasitizing antbirds. Please join us for this exciting talk on marine megafauna and new insights into their functioning in modern ecosystems.
  • Location: University of Konstanz
  • Room: ZT1202 + online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: aalbi@ab.mpg.de
Please join us for the seminar – “Ecological importance and conservation ecology of white sharks” – on the topic of advancements in understanding of the roles of macropredatory sharks in marine food webs and modern ecosystems, presented by Dr. Jerry Moxley (Florida International University). Faced ... [more]

Collective motion of finite collectives

Institute Seminar by Vishwesha Guttal
  • Date: Apr 30, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Vishwesha Guttal
  • I am a faculty member at the Centre for Ecological Sciences at the Indian Institute of Science in Bengaluru, India. I am fascinated by patterns of self-organisation, and nonlinear and stochastic dynamics in ecology. Broadly, in our lab, we study collective animal behaviour, self-organized spatial patterns in vegetation of semi-arid ecosystems. Our overarching goal is to build simple yet “predictive” models of complex dynamical systems. Before joining IISc as a faculty member, I was a postdoc in the group of Iain Couzin at Princeton University; and I did my PhD in Physics at The Ohio State University working with Prof. C Jayaprakash on theoretical ecology. My undergraduate education, in Physics, was at IIT Kanpur.
  • Location: University of Konstanz
  • Room: ZT1202 + online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: pkaushik@ab.mpg.de
A large body of theory of collective motion focuses large groups/populations. However, real animal groups live in small groups, which we call mesoscopic scales, where intrinsic stochastic fluctuations can not be ignored and have counter intuitive effects. In this talk, I will discuss both theory ... [more]

Wintering Areas and Habitats of Southwestern German Honey Buzzards (Bachelor presentation)

Rado Seminar by Anabel Paul
  • Date: Apr 26, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Anabel Paul
  • Location: Hybrid meeting
  • Room: Seminar room MPI-AB Möggingen + Online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: ddechmann@ab.mpg.de
Little is known about the spatial use and migration behavior of European Honey Buzzards (Pernis apivorus) in Germany. Looking at tagging projects in Germany, covering this subject, only one could be found in which German Honey Buzzards were tagged in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany from 2001 to 2011 by ... [more]

Which types of social relationships matter? Affiliative bonds and mortality risk in wild primates.

Institute Seminar by Fernando Campos
  • Date: Apr 23, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Fernando Campos
  • My research aims to understand how social and ecological experiences that accumulate across the life course are linked to individual differences in behavior, health, survival, and fertility. I use noninvasive field, lab, and computational methods to investigate these topics through the long-term study of wild nonhuman primates. I have worked with a variety of different wild primate populations, and I codirect the Santa Rosa Capuchin Project, a long-term research program focusing on white-faced capuchin monkeys in northwestern Costa Rica. I have a B.S in Biology from Caltech, M.A. and PhD degrees in Anthropology from the University of Calgary, and I did a postdoc at Duke University. I am currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of San Antonio, Texas.
  • Location: Bückle St. 5a, 78467 Konstanz
  • Room: Seminar room MPI-AB Bücklestrasse + Online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: ukalbitzer@ab.mpg.de
In humans, having stronger, more numerous, or more supportive social relationships predicts mortality risk from almost every cause of death—a pattern that cuts across cultural, geographic, gender, and socioeconomic lines. Recent studies from a wide range of wild mammals show startling converge with ... [more]

AI workshop with Prof. Dr. Daniel Mertens

by ScientistsNeedMore Schiller & Mertens
  • Start: Apr 18, 2024 09:00 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • End: Apr 19, 2024 05:00 PM
  • Location: University of Konstanz
  • Room: K7
Next Level Scientific Writing with AI [more]

Hierarchical statistical models in wildlife ecology

Institute Seminar by Rahel Sollmann
  • only online
  • Date: Apr 16, 2024
  • Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (Local Time Germany)
  • Speaker: Rahel Sollmann
  • I studied biology at the University of Cologne and the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University Bonn, where I obtained my Diploma in 2006. I obtained my PhD from the Free University Berlin and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in 2011, with a dissertation on the ecology and conservation of jaguars in the central Brazilian Cerrado savannah. I spent the next 10 years in the USA, first as a post-doc in Dr. Beth Gardner’s lab at North Carolina State University (2011-2015), developing and applying hierarchical statistical models to questions of wildlife ecology and management. This was followed by a 1-year postdoc with the US Forest Service in Davis, CA, using HSMs to study the impact of fire and fire management on wildlife. In 2016, I was hired as an Assistant Professor for Quantitative Ecology at the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology at UC Davis. I stayed at UC Davis for five years, teaching introductory statistics and principles of sampling wildlife to undergraduates, and working with graduate students on applying HSM to different questions of wildlife ecology and conservation. In 2021 I moved to Berlin for my current position as Senior Scientist in the Department of Ecological Dynamics at the IZW, where I have been continuing my work on HSM in wildlife research.
  • Location: online
  • Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
  • Contact: cmonteza@ab.mpg.de
Knowing how many species or individuals occur at a given place and time is fundamental to many questions in wildlife ecology, conservation and management. Enumerating wildlife, however, is complicated by our imperfect and varying (with method, species, habitat, etc) ability to detect animals. In ... [more]
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